Itchy Rash Pictures: 6 most common and their treatment

by | Oct 24, 2017 | Blog, Eczema, Hives, Itchy, Rash

Itchy rash picture Atopic dermatitis finger ICD 10 L20.9

Itchy rash with pictures

(Pruritus. Itching. Generalized itching. ICD-10: L29)

Itching is an unpleasant sensation where the skin signals a reflex response to tearing of the skin. Modern research has shown that an itch has many similarities to pain, where both feelings are unpleasant, but where the behavioral patterns differ. Pain creates a pain-reflex and itching creates a tearing of the skin reflex. Itching can also come out from pain; for example in case of excessive heat or electrical stimulation. Examples of causes may include insect stings, mosquito bites or allergies, that triggers the skin’s nerve system to send signals of irritation. Itching starts when there is a skin symptom, and applies to any kind of stimulation of the nerve terminals (nociceptors) in the epidermis (outer skin layer). Itching of the nose, eyes and ears can also occur and can be caused by allergic rhinitis.

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An itch most common cause, is dehydration of the skin. Dry skin makes it susceptible for itching – stress, excessive bathing/showering and cold weather can worsen it.

 

Six common itchy rash pictures with an underlying primary skin disease

1. Atopic Dermatitis (severe itching)

Online dermatologist question
My son David age 10 in photos. Picture of right inside elbow crease. He has eczema. Allergic to pollen, dust mites, dander, milk protein. Itchy. Rough. Left elbow and right armpit as well. A few other patches on his body. It comes and goes in terms of severity. We don’t want to use steroids. What about new Eucrisa cream?

Itchy skin rash pictures Atopic dermatitis eczema children arm ICD 10 L20.9

Online dermatologist answer
Thank you for sending your son’s case. Based on the information and images of your son’s arm, this is consistent with ATOPIC ECZEMA: Atopic dermatitis is very common in children but can persist into adulthood in some cases. It often affects sites like the flexures of the big joints (skin folds cush as the knee, elbows, neck, etc), but it can be found anywhere on the body surface. This condition causes itchy inflammation of the skin with red, dry patches which sometimes lead to cracking of the skin. In some cases, multiple small blisters can appear. Bacterial infections can also add to the problem. At-home treatment options include: avoiding substances that may be irritants (e.g. excessive showering/bathing), applying over-the-counter 1% hydrocortisone cream (twice daily for a week, then once daily for another week and then every other day for 2 weeks) plus frequent application of a moisturizing cream. If it doesn’t improve, see a dermatologist in person since more potent steroid creams requiring a prescription may be needed. You have a specific question about Eucrisa cream. It may well be effective for your son, but in the clinical trials only around 1 in 3 people showed a significant improvement after a month (compared with 1 in 5 people on placebo). I would not recommend that you say ‘never’ to topical steroids. In my practice, topical steroid creams are more effective than 1 in 3 and can also be used very safely long term if used correctly.

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2. Nummular Eczema

Online dermatologist question
39 years old male. Right side of neck, 3x3 inch rash with blisters. Had for approximately 6 days.

Itchy skin rash pictures Nummular dermatitis eczema infection neck ICD 10 L30.0

Online dermatologist answer
Thank you for sending your case. Based on the information and images of your neck, this is possibly a ECZEMA NUMMULARIS: Nummular dermatitis is a type of eczema with coin-shaped red and slightly scaly skin lesions with pruriitus (itching). Nummular dermatitis is often caused by dry skin. Moisturizing cream and a topical steroid applied twice daily would be recommended. A potent steroid cream may be needed to clear the lesions, which will require a prescription from your dermatologist or family doctor. The treatment should be applied during at least 4-6 weeks lowering the dose every 1-2 weeks. It is of utmost importance that you avoid scratching as this only makes the inflammation worse. In your case it looks like you have a secondary infected and you would needs to do a culture before treatment with oral antibiotics. I would recommend that you see your primary care doctor or a dermatologist to do further tests.

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3. Neurodermitis

Online dermatologist question
27 years old female. The spot has been on the inside of my left thigh for over a year now. It itches constantly and is now showing up a few inches above my knee on my left thigh as well. There is nothing on my right leg or anywhere else.

Itchy skin rash pictures Neurodermatitis on thigh kne ICD 10 L28.0

Online dermatologist answer
Based on the information and images, possibly NEURODERMATITIS, a specific form of eczema. In this condition it´s quite frequent to only develop one single very dry and itchy spot like in your case. It´s not dangerous but the itching can get quite troublesome as you describe. The most important thing is to break the vicious circle of itching-scratching. The treatment of choice in most cases is stronger cortisone creams several times daily in the begining and then try to withdraw slowly according to certain withdrawl schedules.  If the itching is extremely intense oral antihistamines can be added during the initial phases of treatment.

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4. Lichen ruber planus

Online dermatologist question
40 years old female. Top of left foot and a couple underneath, top of right foot, left calf affected bad, right calf barely affected. No other affected areas on the body. I have had this for 8 months and it hurts, itches, and is UGLY. I used antifungal thinking it was ringworm and it seemed to work, until it didn’t anymore.

Itchy skin pictures LICHEN RUBER PLANUS foot ICD 10 L30.9

Online dermatologist answer
Thank you for sending your case. Based on the information and images, this is possibly a LICHEN RUBER PLANUS. Lichen planus (a.k.a. lichen ruber) is a chronic inflammatory condition of the skin, which can affect a number of body parts. Common locations are the underside of the forearms, wrists, legs and the inside of the cheeks, but it can also affect both men and women in the genital area. The lesions are commonly slightly raised and reddish-violaceous in color. Itching is not uncommon and can be quite stubborn. Trauma in the area can sometimes cause more lesions to appear (a so-called Koebner phenomenon) so it is important to avoid scratching. Lichen planus can be treated with topical steroid creams but over-the-counter Hydrocortisone 1% is is most cases not sufficient. Stronger steroid creams that requires a prescription are usually needed. For this reason I recommend that you see your family doctor or a dermatologist in person. Sometimes a small skin biopsy is needed to confirm the diagnosis and to rule out other options before the treatment is begun.

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5. Pityriasis rosea

Online dermatologist question
24 years old male. The red spots are on my arm, armpit, back, chest, neck and groin area. Always itchy and intense itching at night. Had this for 6 weeks now . Seen the doctor three times. Had steroid cream, a tablet to stop the itching and an anti fungal tablet. None seem to work.

Itchy rash pictures Pityriasis Rosea arm groin back trunk ICD 10 L42.9

Online dermatologist answer
Thank you for sending your case. Based on the information and images, this is possibly a PITYRIASIS ROSEA: Pityriasis Rosea is a non-contagious, benign rash that is most common in young children. This condition usually starts off with a single red, scaly patch of skin called a ‘herald patch’. Within short, multiple red scaly patches appear on the trunk, upper arms and legs. The lesions disappear without treatment after 6-8 weeks. However, moisturizing cream and a topical steroid can be recommended to relieve the itch. Usually mild steroid creams such as Hydrocortisone 1% are sold over-the-counter. Apply twice daily for a week to start with, then once daily for a week, then every other day for 2-4 weeks. If not better within 2 weeks, see a dermatologist in person to exclude other assessments.

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6. Dermographism

Online dermatologist question
34 years old male. Itching, rash now turning into welts. Cause unknown.

Itchy rash pictures Dermographism urticaria hives on back ICD10 L50.9

Online dermatologist answer
Based on the information and images submitted, this is possibly a URTICARIA: Urticaria or “Hives”. They are frequently caused by allergic reactions; however, there are many nonallergic causes like medication, infection, heat, cold, pressure on the skin or an external irritant for example. This results in the release of the substance histamine in the skin, which causes local inflammation with swelling and gives rise to itching or burning, raised, red skin lesions known as wheals. These lesions have a tendency to move around and disappear within 24 hours only to appear again in other places. Dermographism (the skin becomes raised and inflamed when scratched), as shown in the photographs, is a common symptom. Over-the-counter antihistamine pills (e.g. Desloratadine 5 mg, once daily) are recommended to alleviate itching. Most often this will pass within a matter of days or weeks. If no improvement or if it spreads, see your family doctor or a dermatologist in person for a new evaluation and testing.

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Itchy rash Treatment

While you try and find out what you have other-the-counter symptomatic treatment is available. Treatment can include hydrocortisone steroid cream – for hives, antihistamine is frequently a chosen option. Light clothes/cool bedroom is recommended. Avoid dry skin – use moisturizing frequently – sparingly use water with soap. Not showering every day.  Sun and salt water is therapeutic.

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