Dermoscopy – screen for skin cancer quickly before a biopsy

by | Oct 7, 2017 | Blog, dermoscopy, Skin Cancer

Dermoscopy – what is it?

Dermoscopy - malignant melanoma

Dermoscopy is a technique practiced by dermatologists to screen suspicious skin cancer lesions in order to identify skin cancer quickly. It refers to the examination of the skin, using skin surface microscopy, and can also be called ‘epiluminoscopy’ and ‘epiluminescent microscopy’.

Modern dermoscopy requires a high quality magnifying lens and a LED lighting source called a dermatoscope (dermoscope). It allows the examination of skin structures and patterns of suspicious skin cancer lesions. The dermatoscope First Derm™ makes, named HÜD™, is a convenient and affordable that fits on any smartphone.

 

Dermatoscope/ Dermoscope

A dermatoscope is a diagnostic tool that is simply expressed by a magnifying glass and a special light source that can help the physician visualize completely different patterns, colors and local structures in skin lesions than what we can see with the naked eye. HÜD™ is a modern non-contact dermatoscope, which has a polarized light that does not need any liquid between the skin and the dermatoscope, yet avoiding reflections from the skin surface. These are very handy when you want to scan the entire skin costume quickly without losing time and sticking with liquids. The HÜD™ connects to the a mobile phone and the images are saved digitally, which makes it perfect for sharing or tracking your moles over time.

 

Ask a dermatologist today if you have concerns about your skin

First Derm users that have used a dermatoscope

1. Seborrhoeic keratoses – senile wart

Online Dermatologist question
35 year old female. Appeared a couple weeks ago. No symptoms otherwise. On chest.

Dermoscopy Seborrheic Keratosis on chest spotcancer ICD 10 L82.1

Online Dermatologist answer
Thank you for sending your case. Based on the information and photos of your skin lesion, this is possibly a SEBORRHOEIC KERATOSIS, a benign wart (not contagious) that is very common in adults. It seems to be slightly raised and to have well-defined borders which is typical. Most seborrhoeic keratoses are brown or grey in color and have a wart-like or waxy surface like in your case. They can also have a more red appearance as in your submited picture. If you notices any growth, ulcerations (sores) or changes in color or shape, you should see a dermatologist in person who can examine the lesion. Potential treatments include curettage (scraping) or cryotherapy (freezing with liquid nitrogen). I recommend that you store these images and this answer that you can bring with you on a visit to the dermatologist.

Ask a dermatologist today if you have concerns about your skin

2. Actinic keratosis

Online Dermatologist question
36 year old female. I’ve had this freckle on my arm for a long time but within the past 8 months it started looking like a tiny bruise and bled a few times.

Dermoscopy Actinic keratosis on arm spotcancer ICD 10 L57.0

Online Dermatologist answer
Thank you for sending your case. Based on the information and images of your arm, this is possibly a ACTINIC KERATOSIS: Actinic keratosis is a benign (sometimes called pre-cancerours) lesion in sun-damaged skin, which gives rise to one or multiple, persistent, red and scaly patches in the skin. This is especially common in people with fair skin. It is not dangerous but it should be treated properly. I would recommend that you see a dermatologist to discuss treatment options. The dermatologist might have to take a biopsy to confirm the assessment. If the assessment is confirmed it can be treated in several different ways including cryotherapy (freezing with liquid nitrogen) or different creams containing imiquimod, ingenol mebutate or 5-fluorouracil for example. Another option is so-called photodynamic therapy. In the future, accurate sun protection is mandatory to prevent developing new ones. I recommend that you store these images and this answer and bring them with you to the dermatologist.

Ask a dermatologist today if you have concerns about your skin

4. Dermatofibroma

Online Dermatologist question
47 years old female. Have always had a mole, but it raised in the past several months. Doesn’t itch or bleed.

Dermoscopy Dermatofibroma on arm spotcancer D23.9

Online Dermatologist answer
Thank you for sending your case. Based on the information and images of your skin lesion on your arm, this is possibly a DERMATOFIBROMA. Dermatofibroma is a benign lesion which commonly appears on the legs or arms following an insect bite or other kind of trauma. In the middle, it is usually hard and white and it can be pigmented at the periphery. It may or may not itch. Avoid scratching of the lesion, even if it itches. As with all pigmented lesions of the skin, you should keep an eye on it and see a dermatologist if it grows or changes in size or shape.

Ask a dermatologist today if you have concerns about your skin

6. Basal Cell Cancer (BCC)

Online Dermatologist question
72 years male. I have had this on the right side of my nose for years. It bleeds sometimes.

Dermoscopy Basal Cells Carcinoma (BCC) on nose spotcancer ICD 10 C44.9

Online Dermatologist answer
Thank you for sending your case. Based on the information and images of your nose, this is possibly a BASAL CELL CARCINOMA (BCC). Basal cell carcinoma is a very common skin tumor caused by excessive sun exposure. Fortunately, this type of skin cancer only grows in the skin and does not spread to other organs. Nevertheless, other assessments can also be considered. I recommend that you see a dermatologist in order to confirm the assessment and discuss the most appropriate treatment option in your particular case. A biopsy may be necessary prior to treatment.

Ask a dermatologist today if you have concerns about your skin

7. Benign Mole – Nevus

Online Dermatologist question
8 years old female. Had this mole for years, it seems like it is growing and started bulging, it was originally flat.

Dermoscopy Benign Mole Nevus on neck spotcancer ICD 10 D22.0

Online Dermatologist answer
Thank you for sending your case. Based on the information and images of your mole this is possibly a NEVUS / BENIGN MOLE. It is symmetrical and has a rather homogeneous brown color. It is normal that a mole gets bigger as your child grows. You should however always keep an eye on all your moles and send new images if this becomes asymmetrical in regards to their shape or colors. I also recommend that you store these images for further reference.

8. Hemangioma – an angioma or “cherry spot”

Online Dermatologist question
66 years old male. I discovered it a few months back. On the right side back of my head.My friend said i should check it out.

Dermoscopy HEMANGIOMA angioma or _cherry spot on head spotcancer ICD 10 D18.0

Online Dermatologist answer
Thank you for sending your case. Based on the information and images of your scalp, this is possibly a HEMANGIOMA. An angioma or “cherry spot” is a small and benign proliferation of small blood vessels. This is very common in adults. Several such lesions can appear with different sizes. Normally red in color but they can also be dark red, blue or violaceous. If the lesion grows, becomes darker or bleeds very easily, see a dermatologist in person. Treatment is not needed, but angiomas can be treated for cosmetic reasons with minor surgery or laser treatment.

10. Dermal Mole – Nevus

Online Dermatologist question
27 years old female. It is on my back by by bra and sometimes it gets irritated. Stings when scratched. It builds out, I am not sure if it has changed over time.

Dermoscopy Benign Mole Dermal Nevus on back spotcancer ICD 10 D22.9

Online Dermatologist answer
Thank you for sending your case. Based on the information and images of your mole, this is possibly a DERMAL NEVUS . A type of benign mole. Typically these moles are brown or black as in your case, slightly raised and soft. Sometimes hairs grow in or around them as can be seen in your case. This is completely normal. If this mole or any other one grows, changes or become asymmetrical in regards to its shape or color, send new images or see a dermatologist.

Ask a dermatologist today if you have concerns about your skin

11. Lentigo solaris – sun spot

Online Dermatologist question
54 years old female. I discovered this spot a few weeks ago in the mirror. I do sail and play golf a lot.

Dermoscopy Lentigo solaris sun spot on the head spotcancer ICD 10 L81.4

Online Dermatologist answer
Thank you for sending your case. Based on the information and images of your head, this is possibly a LENTIGO: Lentigo solaris or solar lentigo (often called “sun spots”) are caused by chronic sun exposure. These light to dark brown spots are common on the face, arms, shoulders, chest and legs which are excessively exposed to the sun’s UV-rays. Some may become a bit elevated/raised, lesions known as seborrhoeic keratosis (benign wart-like lesions). It is recommended to use sunscreen to prevent further lesions. If these spots change or become darker/black, see a dermatologist in person to rule out transformation to a skin cancer.

Ask a dermatologist today if you have concerns about your skin

12. Malignant Melanoma

Online Dermatologist question
56 years old male. I have had it a couple of years. It itches sometimes on my arm. I have been in the sun a lot and got burnt. I work as a farmer.

Dermoscopy malignant Melanoma on arm spotcancer ICD 10 L43.9

Online Dermatologist answer
Thank you for your photos. Based on these and attached information of your arm, this is possibly a MALIGNANT MELANOMA in its early stages. From the picture and information at hand I cannot rule out skin cancer. I recommend that you see a dermatologist in person as soon as possible for an assessment, a biopsy might be taken. Store these pictures and the answer, take them with you to the dermatologist. You can use the link below to get a dermatologist appointment.

Ask a dermatologist today if you have concerns about your skin

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